Trained to a high standard in historically accurate techniques which include Goldwork, Silk Shading, Whitework, Canvas techniques, Stumpwork, Appliqué, Blackwork, Crewelwork as well as others.

Experience includes working on large studio projects and on small scale items for customers.

CREWELWORK

Worked in crewel wool on linen, this decorative technique is one of the earliest forms of surface stitching. Basic designs can include between six to ten crewelwork stitches and a range of colours is used for tonal accents.

GOLDWORK

Dating back over 1000 years, with its roots in religious and royal embroidery, goldwork has a luxurious and opulent quality.  The RSN is renowned for its teaching of goldwork and the traditional methods are used in church work, livery and royal commissions.  Today, in addition to ecclesiastical, ceremonial and military applications, contemporary goldwork designs are used in the fashion industry and interior design.  Goldwork embroidery uses a wide variety of metal threads including gilt copper and silver and can be combined with other techniques such as silk shading  to produce sumptuous effects.

SILK SHADING

This beautiful technique, sometimes known as “painting with a needle”, uses a number of colours in cotton or silk threads, blended together to create the natural appearance of a flower, fruit, plant or animal.  The technique uses long and short stitches (either in silk or cotton threads or even wool) and the emphasis is on blending colour and understanding tonal shade.

WHITEWORK

The term applies to a variety of techniques ranging from the bold stitches of Mountmellick and Hardanger to the delicate work of Ayrshire and Fine White embroidery. Traditionally worked with white thread on white fabric and used for bridal and christening wear and ecclesiastical embroidery.  Whitework techniques adapt well to contemporary designs and the introduction of colour.

CANVAS TECHNIQUES

Canvas Shading is used to blend colours in a design to create a realistic effect.  Canvas Stitches uses a range of stitches and threads (including metal threads) to create depth and movement.  Both are worked on an open weave canvas. Sometimes incorrectly referred to as tapestry, and also known as needlepoint, the use of wool on canvas was traditionally used for seat covers and rugs.  It was used in a basic form on medieval vestments and furnishings, but it is really during the second half of the 16th century that canvaswork in its current form became a part of everyday life.

STUMPWORK

Also known as raised embroidery uses an array of different materials and embroidery techniques to tell a contemporary story in stitch using three dimensional elements. Techniques include silk work, goldwork, counted  work, flat & raised stitching, bead work, padding and needlelace.  Stumpwork designs are varied and imaginative offering scope for a high degree of creativeness.

APPLIQUÉ

Used to great effect in larger projects such as ecclesiastical items and banners, this technique enables pieces of embroidery to be joined together to create large pieces of work. Appliqué with embroidery enables various fabrics to be used on the same piece of embroidery.

BLACKWORK

Steeped in history, this technique involves using intricate patterns which have an almost graphic quality to create an embroidered picture.  Blackwork was traditionally used as decoration on caps, collars and cuffs and usually depicted small floral motifs in the repeat design.  Both sides of the embroidery were to be seen so it was worked in a double running stitch (also known as Holbein stitch), making the front and back identical.